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Posted: Sat Apr 21, 2018 7:58am
7 replies235 views4 members subscribed

Hi all.  

So feel like we have a million questions but will try and keep it short! 

So have always holidayed in Spain, Costa Blanca.  Parents are moving over soon looking in the Alemeria area..so we want to follow too. 

That is my hubby..53, myself 47 and our daughter 16. 

It seems there is so much we need to find out..what is the best resource step by step without feeling overwhelmed with info? 

We are looking at maybe a years time as want to save some money up to come over with.  We will both need jobs and will be renting. 

Not sure about my daughter..she struggles slightly accedemically so not sure what education she will have by time we move..she is off to college here soon to try and least get maths and English GCSE.  Do they recognise them in Spain? 

She would like to move into photography work..she is very good.  Are there collages/courses she could do?  

Regards area to live..do we look for area that we like first or look for jobs and see which area they are in?  

Any help hugely appreciated..feeling a bit lost at the minute. This is huge for us but so ready to do the move!  

Thank you xx

271935

271935

Very helpful member

Sat Apr 21, 2018 8:09am

Posts: 818

Location: Villamartin

567 helpful posts

Posted: Sat Apr 21, 2018 8:09am

There is little to no work in Spain. Anything will be low skill below UK minimum wage. Opportunities for your daughter will be non existent unless she is happy waiting tables or working in a bar. Personally I would leave her at home with family as she will have a much better chance in life.

I would suggest you get a big chunk of savings to act as a cushion as living out here can be expensive especially with private healthcare costs.

That way you will have a couple of months to try and make it work.

JJBrown

JJBrown

Original Poster

Sat Apr 21, 2018 9:02am

Posted: Sat Apr 21, 2018 9:02am

wow.  Well i have waitressed for years so have no problem with that.  Love working with the public. 

As for our daughter..no way would we go without her!!  We are her family!  

How long have you lived in Spain?  If its that bad why do you stay?  

271935

271935

Very helpful member

Sat Apr 21, 2018 9:18am

Posts: 818

Location: Villamartin

567 helpful posts

Posted: Sat Apr 21, 2018 9:18am

I don't live there. I have a holiday home. 

It's down to personal choice. Non Spanish speaking Brits will struggle to find anything meaningful or at any sort of reasonable rates of pay.

If you do find work you may have a chance of covering your living costs. However, the risk is very high hence my reference to savings.

My comments over your daughter my sound harsh. However, even fewer opportunities will exist for her

Stephanie86

Stephanie86

Helpful member

Sat Apr 21, 2018 11:11am

Posts: 503

Location: Lliber

300 helpful posts

Posted: Sat Apr 21, 2018 11:11am

‘Both need jobs’? Sorry to be harsh, but do you have trade/professional qualifications? Do you speak Spanish? Previous 271935 perfectly correct about lack of work here. I do know several British people who have started their own - legal! - businesses here, mainly dealing with the ex-pat population, but I think they may have been younger than you are now. There are several legal hurdles to be negotiated if you intend to go down this route, at the very least you would need to consult a gestor. You will need to bring money with you to live on as the likelihood of finding well paying work is not high and Spanish firms are likely to employ Spanish nationals first. There are Spanish universities and colleges, but she may struggle if she does not speak the language. You may have to be prepared to do basic waitressing etc, but even supermarket work will require Spanish, although in areas with high tourist/expat populations it may be possible. You will also need to have private health insurance to qualify for residency.

jimtaylor

jimtaylor

Legendary helpful member

Sat Apr 21, 2018 3:54pm

Posts: 3300

Location: Almoradí

4564 helpful posts

Posted: Sat Apr 21, 2018 3:54pm

I do live here, but we only moved out once we were in receipt of pensions and entitled to free health care. I wouldn't try to stop you moving out, but you have to be realistic. Unless you have special skills to offer and are fluent in Spanish, then it's unlikely that you'd get other than low-paying jobs, and you'd have to be lucky to get them. By the time you'd paid your rent and private health insurance payments, if you could do that, you'd have nothing left to live on.

I know very few residents here that aren't retired like us. The only younger ones I know are running their own businesses, some very successfully, or are being supported by parents who are retired out here.

Sorry, but that's the fact of the Spanish economic situation at the moment.

JJBrown

JJBrown

Original Poster

Tue Apr 24, 2018 7:13pm

Posted: Tue Apr 24, 2018 7:13pm

Stephanie86 wrote on Sat Apr 21, 2018 11:11am:

‘Both need jobs’? Sorry to be harsh, but do you have trade/professional qualifications? Do you speak Spanish? Previous 271935 perfectly correct about lack of work here. I do know several British people who have started their own - legal! - businesses here, mainly dealing with the ex-pat population, but I think they may have been younger than you are now. There are several legal hurdles to be negotiated if you intend to go down this route, at the very least you would need to consult a gestor. You will need to bring money with you to live on as the likelihood of finding well paying work is not high and Spanish firms are likely to employ Spanish nationals first. There are Spanish universities and colleges, but she may struggle if she does not speak the language. You may have to be prepared to do basic waitressing etc, but even supermarket work will require Spanish, although in areas with high tourist/expat populations it may be possible. You will also need to have private health insurance to qualify for residency.

Hi.  Thank you.  Learning the language is high on our priority list.  My husband is a lorry driver at present so he may keep with the driving more international. 

Im happy to waitress, although..once i have the language..have lots of customer service and reception experience.  

We are like i said saving money up behind us before we even think about moving.  We are definitely not going into this lightly.  

Stephanie86

Stephanie86

Helpful member

Tue Apr 24, 2018 7:24pm

Posts: 503

Location: Lliber

300 helpful posts

Posted: Tue Apr 24, 2018 7:24pm

Would think your husband being very sensible to keep up with international driving. Re your own reception/customer service experience, you could of course try the hotels in whichever area you are - but would advise that most receptionists in tourist areas are multi-lingual, usually to a reasonably high standard as they are often younger and have learned them as part of their basic education. And if you are of working age, then private health insurance is a legal requirement of the Spanish state - and this can be fairly costly. Your EHIC is solely for tourist emergencies. Suggest you start Spanish lessons ASAP and try to make sure you can cope at a reasonable conversational level.

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