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Electricity price hike - Why so high? - Page 20

James76

Posted: Wed Mar 10, 2021 10:49am

Posts: 39

6 helpful points

Location: La Marina

Joined: 29 May 2017

Posted: Wed Mar 10, 2021 10:49am

I’m thinking of putting in a wood stove in a duplex home,I had a rather large Canadian one in another holiday home I owned in Ireland some time back. It was very large and had a back boiler which could power upto 13 radiators . My house which was large sat in its own plot of land so I had no close neighbors to think about smoke etc when it was installed. They took the pipe up 3 feet from the stove then, put in a bend where it then went through the wall and up the outside of the house. This time I want to put a really small stove in my home for the wife for the winter months,does the pipe go straight through the ceiling or does it go out through the wall and up to my roof terrace upstairs?,in general would I need to have the community administrator involved. Now my friend who lives 4 doors down has a bungalow joined on and he’s a stove. So they must be allowed. I’m only asking in general,so any views,or help,would be fantastic. Thanks awfully........James.

poppydom

Posted: Wed Mar 10, 2021 12:21pm

Posts: 54

20 helpful points

Location: La Marina

Joined: 12 Sep 2016

Posted: Wed Mar 10, 2021 12:21pm

Go with Fox Energy 

Much cheaper than Iberdrola

Dennis39

Posted: Wed Mar 10, 2021 1:58pm

Dennis39

Helpful member

Posts: 128

54 helpful points

Location: Villamartin

Joined: 3 Oct 2016

Posted: Wed Mar 10, 2021 1:58pm

poppydom wrote on Wed Mar 10, 2021 12:21pm:

Go with Fox Energy 

Much cheaper than Iberdrola

I went onto their site and it is in English and they so they do everything for you.  Could you possibly gives some idea of what the tariffs are etc please

Denise

tormos11

Posted: Thu Mar 11, 2021 5:26pm

Posts: 5

Location: Elda

Joined: 2 Aug 2020

Posted: Thu Mar 11, 2021 5:26pm

James76 wrote on Wed Mar 10, 2021 10:49am:

I’m thinking of putting in a wood stove in a duplex home,I had a rather large Canadian one in another holiday home I owned in Ireland some time back. It was very large and had a back boiler which could power upto 13 radiators . My house which was large sat in its own plot of land so I had no cl...

...ose neighbors to think about smoke etc when it was installed. They took the pipe up 3 feet from the stove then, put in a bend where it then went through the wall and up the outside of the house. This time I want to put a really small stove in my home for the wife for the winter months,does the pipe go straight through the ceiling or does it go out through the wall and up to my roof terrace upstairs?,in general would I need to have the community administrator involved. Now my friend who lives 4 doors down has a bungalow joined on and he’s a stove. So they must be allowed. I’m only asking in general,so any views,or help,would be fantastic. Thanks awfully........James.

look in to pelletstoves much cleaner,

BlueMooner

Posted: Tue Apr 6, 2021 5:05pm

Posts: 4

5 helpful points

Joined: 18 May 2020

Posted: Tue Apr 6, 2021 5:05pm

Hi All, new to the forum and currently in the process of buying a 3 bed apartment in Campoverde. Are there any new deals for electricity that anyone can recommend? A friend has the same style of apartment and has been paying €25 a month to Curenenergia (which I think is Iberdrola). This is clearly going to be the standing charge as nobody has been allowed to visit. On average he pays €50 a month, which seems very reasonable as he has 3 air con units as well as the usual white goods. I'll have lots of questions over the coming months and any help will be very gratefully received. My wife and I have found the forum very informative so far. Thank you

Portet

Posted: Tue Apr 6, 2021 5:10pm

Portet

Very helpful member

Posts: 562

525 helpful points

Location: Moraira

Joined: 13 Jan 2021

Posted: Tue Apr 6, 2021 5:10pm

BlueMooner wrote on Tue Apr 6, 2021 5:05pm:

Hi All, new to the forum and currently in the process of buying a 3 bed apartment in Campoverde. Are there any new deals for electricity that anyone can recommend? A friend has the same style of apartment and has been paying €25 a month to Curenenergia (which I think is Iberdrola). This is clea...

...rly going to be the standing charge as nobody has been allowed to visit. On average he pays €50 a month, which seems very reasonable as he has 3 air con units as well as the usual white goods. I'll have lots of questions over the coming months and any help will be very gratefully received. My wife and I have found the forum very informative so far. Thank you

How to reduce the cost of your electricity bill - Utilities: Electric, gas and water recommendations and advice in Formentera Del Segura - Formentera Del Segura forum - Costa Blanca forum in the Alicante province of Spain

Kimmy11

Posted: Tue Apr 6, 2021 5:19pm

Kimmy11

Legendary helpful member

Posts: 5502

10388 helpful points

Joined: 8 Aug 2017

Posted: Tue Apr 6, 2021 5:19pm

Hi Bluemooner and welcome to the forum,

Congratulations on your purchase - enjoy!  

I'm sure you've seen that there's a lot of info of here.  Personally, I find that if you use the search function at the top of the page, it's better to search 'Costa Blanca', rather than just your own location, for a greater range of results.  Anything you can't find or specific questions not covered, please just ask.

Kind regards,

Kim

Julia001

Posted: Tue Apr 27, 2021 1:52am

Posts: 6

2 helpful points

Location: Los Dolses

Joined: 20 Mar 2016

Posted: Tue Apr 27, 2021 1:52am

Hi, I'm also new to the Forum. 

Reading your comments tonight, I agree with all you said about the split tarriffs with Iberdrola. We have a split tarriff bill as well, with our cheap rate going from 4pm to 12 midnight, which allows me to cook a meal at teatime for my Hubby, then wash at night, ready to hang out in the morning. Makes a lot of difference to the monthly bills as well. Try to work out when you use the electricity most and go from there. We also have fitted ceiling fans to the bedrooms, this takes care of the hot summers, as we don't use the aircon in the rooms at night, we just use the fans which are very efficient and a lot cheaper than the aircon. If you choose to buy the fans, make sure they are silent ones, as the noisy ones do get on your nerves a bit when trying to sleep. Worth just paying a bit more for these ones.

Hope this helps, good to speak to you folks,

Jules x

LizzyF

Posted: Wed Sep 1, 2021 9:55pm

Posts: 24

6 helpful points

Location: Altea

Joined: 23 Aug 2021

Posted: Wed Sep 1, 2021 9:55pm

jimtaylor wrote on Sun Jan 7, 2018 4:58pm:

In that case I certainly won't even dream of helping you if you ask questions in the future.

Hello 

There is an ongoing political row about this, and huge indignation and anger. For things to totally deteriorate, giving way to social unrest and even rioting I don't think it would surprise anyone. Maybe even more likely as one political party is stirring up the unrest, suggesting to those who are disgruntled to 'take action'! :-(    so very sad... )  

The following is an attempt to put in a nutshell some 'facts' (the data below is from Eurostat, which issues European countries' statistics)..... but yes, a new record is being set daily, and it's been going on for too long!  - but there are several reasons why this is happening, so it's not just 'welcome to Spain' or being taken lightly or in anyone's stride.  ... btw - my attempt to explain this through translation, means this is not my opinion. For what it's worth, I don't find it 'acceptable' - quite the contrary. It is totally unacceptable and the Government should, I feel step in, however...  here goes (hoping not to get a barrage of rude remarks- I m only trying to help)  

so yes, The 'Lecky bills are rising, 'yet another new record' is the news headline, on a daily basis, which is unacceptable. 

I'm selecting only a few points from the following lengthy article in Spanish, to keep it as 'informative' as possible. It's complicated to say the least! 

(see below the Spanish article, full article I found, should anyone want to delve into the details)

· Spain's electricity is the 8th most expensive in Europe, taxes (VAT + ) included: comparatively speaking, electricity is more expensive in Denmark, Germany, Italy, Sweden, Belgium or Austria. 

· Apparently 80% of Spain's electricity is 'imported' (something that is surprising ... isn't it?) 

· To add to this, Spain produces most of the 'domestic' electricity sadly, from carbon (which is costly AND it is penalised > increasing the cost even more, a 'carbon footprint' penalty applied directly by the EU            ·  Another source of electricity, is hydroelectric power. This means releasing huge, much larger than normal amounts of the very precious dwindling water which had been held in the reservoirs behind dams, in Spain. The latest maximum electricity cost is illustrated by shocking photos of reservoirs that look like something out of a spooky movie - villages unveiled that had been underwater for decades.  

· Spain is already drought stricken, and is calculated to become part of 'the Sahara region' in not too many years/ decades! You only need to google a satellite picture of Spain, to appreciate how bone dry it is, over all. So few green areas......  

The production of 'hydroelectric power' is provoking further outrage on account of most reservoirs being almost 'drained dry' (the levels were already historically low), levels which understandably in Spain are hard to top up, despite the recent torrential rain and terrible pictures I m watching now of floods and muddy water in Toledo, areas of Castellón and Valencia... which is causing havoc. All in all, a frightening reminder of how 'not enough' at all is being done regarding global warming. 

Remember the 'hose - pipe' bans in the Uk, one of the wettest countries in the world?                       Imagine Spain! I suppose water, as an extremely scarce commodity world wide, is very much at the route of many problems, and is exacerbating this problem.

Getting the general picture?  - whichever way you turn, to produce electricity domestically in Spain, is extremely expensive and has a terrible negative knock-on effect. And finally, add to all of this, 'lecky bills are heavily taxed (VAT at 21% plus an additional 'special electricity tax' at 5.113%), money which in turn is 'dedicated' to offset renewable energies / solar, wind etc., etc., etc., ... 

Some background 'History' > In Spain the cost of electricity had been established / fixed by the state for decades. When it was 'liberalized' - a tariff was created TUR;  The majority opted for this TUR, which accounts for approx 22 million consumers in Spanish homes who are now affected, having chosen the fixed tariff, TUR as opposed to chancing a freely applied market price. 

Hence some but not many, electricity bills not suffering quite so badly. 

Hoping this is making a bit of sense of it all... 

Every 3 months the government 'decides' calculates the corresponding tariff TUR to be applied. Every 3 months because there is an 'auction' to supply  'electricity'. This is how the price "P" is established... However this price is only pertinent to half of the total (before taxes) that the consumer is liable to pay.        · The other half are called ' peajes de acceso' connection costs and is also regulated. a cost or Payment for how the electricity supply is 'accessed' and distributed. Governments often times decide to 'freeze' these costs, or delay any price rises, or 'approve' a lower cost to be applied, which in turn would affect the cost of supply 'across the board'  

and so it goes on.

Hoping that whoever asked the question, has at least got this far and understood a good part of it. Apologies for the looser or awkward translation, toward the end... getting tired! and I m not getting paid for this one! 

:-) 

En España la electricidad es la octava más cara de Europa después de impuestos detrás de países como Dinamarca, Alemania, Italia, Suecia, Bélgica o Austria. Esta comparación debe hacerse con impuestos, puesto que en diversos países europeos las ayudas a las renovables se consideran tributos o tasas, a diferencia de lo que ocurre en nuestro país, donde están incluidas en el precio del suministro. En Europa, el precio medio del megavatio/hora, antes de impuestos, está en los 178 euros. En nuestro país ronda los 194 euros en 2011, según Eurostat, la oficina de estadística de la Comisión Europea.

Hay muchas consideraciones que habría que tener en cuenta. La primera es que España es un país que debe importar el 80% de la energía que consume. La energía propia se concentra en el carbón, de escasa calidad y costosa explotación, la energía hidráulica, barata pero inestable por los períodos de sequía, y las energías renovables que son, con diferencia, las tecnologías más costosas. El sistema eléctrico está muy intervenido por el Estado que utiliza el recibo de la luz para cobrar impuestos y para ingresar dinero que después destina a distintas subvenciones más o menos relacionadas con la energía. El coste de la energía consumida, sumando los usuarios industriales y domésticos, alcanzaría el 32,4%. A esto hay que añadir el coste del transporte que es de un 3,7% y la distribución, un promedio del 14%. Y aquí acaba con lo que en realidad tiene que ver con la electricidad.

Entramos en el capítulo de impuestos. En el recibo de la luz se abona el 21% por IVA e Impuesto Especial sobre la Electricidad, que es un 5,113%. El otro plato fuerte son las subvenciones a las energías renovables como la eólica, solar o la termosolar. En estas subvenciones, que se llaman primas, se va casi el 19% de la factura eléctrica mensual. También hay que añadir que cerca del 5% del recibo de la luz se dedica a amortizar la deuda acumulada, el déficit de tarifa. Este apartado costará a los españoles unos 2.200 millones de euros en 2012. En España, durante décadas, el Estado ha establecido el precio de la luz. A la hora de liberalizar el sistema eléctrico se creó la tarifa de último recurso (TUR). La mayoría de los hogares españoles se acogieron a este tipo de tarifa y rechazaron entrar en el mercado libre. En la TUR están unos 22 millones de consumidores. El Gobierno, cada tres meses, decide el precio del recibo correspondiente a la TUR. Esto es así porque cada trimestre se realiza una subasta de electricidad y esta es la referencia para calcular el precio energético. Pero este precio supone solo la mitad de lo que paga el cliente (excluidos los impuestos). La otra mitad son los denominados peajes de acceso, que es el pago por el uso de las redes de distribución de la energía eléctrica. Los Gobiernos muchas veces deciden congelar los peajes, retrasar su incremento o aprobar uno menor a lo que exigiría la cobertura de todos los costes regulados.

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